Thoughts on unequal social pressure regarding young pregnancy


When a woman gets pregnant unexpectedly young, she is told she should have used better birth control. She is told she should have waited until she had a firm career future before she had sex. She is told she shouldn’t have an abortion because “She made her bed and should now sleep in it!”

If she does have an abortion, so that she can continue her education, she is labeled a murderer and treated like a monster. If she does have the child, she is either forced to give the child up for adoption and experience the deep, lasting pain of relinquishing her child, or forced to move back in with her parents and possibly forfeit her education as a result of needing to get a job in order to ease the burden she’s now given her family.

She is often treated as the destroyer of the boy’s future, the one that lead him astray with her loose morals and unthinking carefree nonchalance regarding sex and her failure to properly prevent pregnancy.

From the moment the pregnancy test shows up positive, a woman is held responsible for getting pregnant.

The father however? He is treated with sympathy. His lost youth. The possible loss of his shining future as a result of the burden of financial responsibility he must now endure. His sad mistake that might ruin his chances at becoming all the things he’s dreamt about. 

When a pregnancy happens to a male,  society looks to what that man could have been in regards to his future.

When a pregnancy happens to a female, society looks to what that woman should have done in regards to her past.

Published by Bexley Benton. (Pen name)

I am B (call me BB and I will gut you) I like daisies, books, and men who understand the wisdom of Kermit the Frog.

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